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FLASH! My “What’s New With Sarah Bates Novels” e-zine launched in May. Want to


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                        NEW REVIEWS!



Great Depiction of Ms. Cady's Formative Years! More Please!

By Sherrie Miranda on November 2, 2016

Format: Paperback

I bought this book at The Women's History Museum at Liberty Station here in San Diego. My mother's maiden name was Cady & I wanted to see if there was anything that hinted at our being related to Miss Cady.

But, once I got reading it, I was fascinated by this woman, who although a feminist by today's standards, still loved fancy clothes & parties. She loved talking with the men, which at that time was not allowed. I loved seeing how she continued her education by getting others on her side.

I got so into the book that I began to worry about her attraction to her sister's husband. But, Elizabeth had scruples & when push came to shove, she told her brother-in-law to shove off.

Like others here, I would love to read a sequel. Even though there is plenty of nonfiction writing about Ms. Cady Stanton's suffragette years, historical fiction is so much more fun to read. In fact, if Ms. Bates does not write the sequel, I may not read anything else about this woman who very likely is an ancestor of mine!


4.0 out of 5 stars

Definitely made Elizabeth C. Stanton feel more real to me!

By EpicFehlReader on November 8, 2016

Format: Paperback

3.5 Stars


When I mentioned to my mother that I was reading this book, her response was, "Elizabeth Cady Stanton... that name sounds familiar for some reason..." Many of you might be having a similar response to the title of this book. That might be because you might mostly know Stanton for being a bestie of suffragette bigwig Susan B. Anthony. Together, these two ladies (along with many, many others let's not forget) were a powerhouse team for getting the vote for women, though Stanton sadly did not live to see her work actually become law (Stanton played a pivotal part in the development of the 19th Amendment of the US Constitution, which gives women the right to vote, but it wasn't made law until after her death).... because this kind of stuff takes FOREVER to make happen sometimes! But like many historical notables, the woman Elizabeth gets pushed aside for the legend that's grown to near-mythic proportions.


What author Sarah Bates tries to do with The Lost Diaries is cut through all that and bring Elizabeth's story back down to earth. What might this person have been like as a everyday, living, breathing woman? To do that, Bates starts with illustrating the young and curious Elizabeth's earliest calls toward activism, which first budded with the realization that she would be denied opportunities granted to her brother, father, male cousins, etc. On top of that, it didn't take long for Elizabeth to join her father in his passionate pursuit of abolition. As Elizabeth writes in one of the fictional diary entries: "People with closed minds infuriate me."


 


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